Nonfiction

There is a fine line between Creative Non-Fiction, and Nonfiction.  Below is a little of both:

Creative Nonfiction in general.

reality check
Reality Check

The aim of this writing style is to engage the reader’s imagination through the reading process. The individual reader brings his own experiences, fears and happiness to the written page, which makes the writing come to life for him. I call it Suggestive Descriptive Summary.

Creative Nonfiction is reporting. It’s a telling of what happened, but in a literary way. As to telling, none of us like to be “told,” but when we create images in our minds, we find out for ourselves, through suggestive passages, and now the validity of “overhearing a conversation,” the fun of putting the clues together, makes active readers of us all.

The working distinction between fiction and nonfiction is, are the facts being reported as accurately as possible, or although the story could have happened, it did it actually happen?

The writer strives to report what is real, but delivers the facts in an emotionally enticing way. Only the writer knows when he steps over the line and turns fiction into fact, or vice versa. And, as is usually said, the names may be changed to protect the innocent.

The genre label, Suggestive Descriptive Summary, came from Theodore A. Rees Cheney, in his book “Writing Creative Nonfiction.” If you like the genre, I highly recommend the book.

Creative Nonfiction writings by Judy Evicci:

The Musician, I remember Johnny

Connected

Knowing the Bad Boys

Woodland High School Reunion – Class of 1957

The Mule and the Hay Contractor

Corsica Island